Lyle Ball

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Lyle Ball

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Quarry II

- Watercolor, pre-1970
- Sight: 22" high x 27.5” wide
- Frame: 31" high x 37" wide
- Signed lower right

PRICE: 1,200 INQUIRE

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About the work

Titled on reverse with the artist’s handwritten Reno address and inscribed #843. 

Reno artist Lyle Ball journeyed over the Sierras to California’s foothill region east of Sacramento to find the subject for this watercolor. The scene shows one of the granite quarries in Placer County, and appears to be a convincing match for the Eureka Granite Quarry at Rocklin.

  Eureka Granite Quarry in Rocklin, published 1895 - Courtesy of California Geological Survey

Eureka Granite Quarry in Rocklin, published 1895 - Courtesy of California Geological Survey

Information in The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, published by the State Mining Bureau in 1906, describes Rocklin as “the principal granite-producing point in the Sacramento valley.” It goes on to say: 

“The Rocklin quarries are comparatively close together. They occur on an area probably less than a mile square. The first quarry was opened in 1863, and the stone was used in construction work on the Southern (then Central) Pacific Railroad. In most places over the quarry area the granite occurs at the surface. Much of the work in the different quarries is done by hand. Each of the quarries has a railway spur to the quarry, all connecting with the Southern Pacific Railroad at Rocklin."

Housed in the original frame under glass. Light soiling to linen liner with minor mars to frame edges typical of age; painting is excellent with vibrant colors.  

About the artist… 

Lyle Ball (1909 - 1992) descended from a pioneer family whose connection to the lands of Nevada around Reno spanned more than 150 years. Like many of his fellow Nevada artists, Ball described Nevada’s landscapes as having “a power” over him that couldn’t be described in words alone. He was largely self-taught, but acknowledged the influence of Craig Sheppard and Hans Meyer-Kassel, both of whom are represented in the collection of Nevada Fine Art. 

Ball qualified for membership in the Society of Western Artists in 1970 and thereafter placed the initials S.W.A. after his signature, which assists in dating his works.  

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